Tuesday, January 03, 2012

Your Robins Have Arrived ... and boy are they thirsty!



If you live up north where winter really IS winter and you have been wondering what your vacationing robins are doing ... well, they are here.

They are here by the hundreds, filling my yard, my forest, and my goldfish pond.

Every day around sunset, it seems a new flock arrives and takes turns bathing in every spot of water around PFHQ ... more validation for my belief that even tiny bodies of water can make a difference to wildlife.

... Which is why I keep installing them around PFHQ.


Growing up, and living most of my life in Florida, I only know Robins as members of large noisy flocks.
In the summer, up north, are they more solitary/small groupish?


21 comments:

Pablo said...

In the spring, summer, and fall here in Missouri I nearly always see them as solitary birds. Occasionally I'll see a half dozen working on a freshly watered yard but never more than that together. I have seen small flocks in my forest in the winter too.

Deb said...

I saw a robin last week during the Christmas bird count here! Very unusual. In the summer once they get settled into nesting they are pretty solitary.

Marilyn Kircus said...

When I started hiking in Arkansas in the 80's, I was surprised to find flocks of hundreds of robins. They were living on yaupon berries in the pine forests.

And in Houston, when the robins left, I knew it was spring. A few robins do breed there, mostly where there are irrigated golf courses.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

Robins don't need a large territory to nest but they are very territorial about where they do set up housekeeping for the summer. They don't flock up until nesting is over and are about to head out of town. It is good to know they have someplace warm and welcoming to go to.

Dina said...

They are so cute. I very rarely see them here in Tampa. I did just see a huge flock of them over Christmas in Atlanta. They were hanging out in a cemetery.

Anonymous said...

I was out in the country in southern Missouri one year when the robins were making their annual flight down south. It was a sight to see-thousands of them passing overhead--had to watch from inside because they pottied as they flew!
Momadness

Anonymous said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgVG4CQvf2U

is this what you agree with?

lisa said...

You take care of them for us now ;)

threecollie said...

I think the really bright red one in the foreground might be our porch robin....maybe....
We get small flocks in the twenties or so outside breeding season, then mostly pairs and sometimes the babies when they fledge. I am so glad you posted these guys as the handful that have been hanging around all fall left town about a week ago and I have been missing them.

crackercowlady said...

The robins have arrived in Homosassa also.
Thanks for your great Cracker bull photo (10/4/11). I just wanted you to know that I'm taking your advice: I'm painting it in oils as a companion to Maggie, my Cracker cow painting. (Maggie's on the cover of my book...See crackercow.com)

lesle said... said...

35 years ago, the robins came through downtown Tallahassee on February 20. Since the 1980s they come earlier and earlier each year. Yours will be here in a few days, I presume. Personally, I attribute it to global climate change. Shift happens.

Mark said...

Around here (NW Georgia) they are usually singletons, but, as Pablo says, I sometimes see a small flock working over a lawn. I am pretty sure I have never seen even a single robin up on our mountain. It seems we have crows, a few pigeons, hawks, wild turkeys, and owls, but very few songbirds.

Thunder Dave said...

Wow, wierd behavior. Stressed out and terratorial in their day to day lives up north and then joining together to have fun down south in Florida, huh never heard of that before! ;-)

Thunder Dave said...

I got so excited to be back up on the web that I forgot to say that the fish, caviar, salad, assorted fried corn thingies, and the bonus of having the girls (excuse me, I mean young ladies!) there were all great! The only improvement would have been if JR could have there, but we'll catch up with him soon!
Thanks for helping us get the new year started right!

Lynn said...

I'm so glad you have that many birds in your neck of the woods. We used to have a bunch of birds in the area and they've slowly gone down in numbers. However I think they are being taken over by squirrels. I had 8 of them in my yard yesterday and I dont have a big piece of property!

edifice rex said...

Drop by my blog if you have a chance today! Partay goin' on!

Crackerboy said...

Used to see big flocks of them when I was growing up around Sebring in the '50's. I still see them in Central Florida. I'm not sure I've ever seen one here on the Gold Coast until you get five or six miles inland. Why, I've no idea.

Love the new template.

Anonymous said...

Hi, here in New York I often see massive numbers of robins busily de-worming lawns February through April, sometimes over a hundred per acre! So they don't all go south, or as far south as Florida. Once nesting starts they scatter and become territorial. Cool video!

Floridacracker said...

Thanks for the comments robin lovers.
I'm sorry I have been scarce, busy in the classroom.

I have an abundance of things to share though ... GROUPER FOR ONE!

WILL POST TOMORROW.

Ericka said...

yay for water!

thanks for taking such good care of "our" robins while you have them!

Marc M. said...

Hi...

I live in spring Hill Fl and there are so many birds Robin included.

They came in just after the new year.

I have lived here for 20 years and I have never seen so many birds this time of year.