Friday, January 20, 2006

Hay Harvest


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The dry winter weather is good for hay baling. These round rolls were being loaded on a farm down the road from my place. Each roll goes for about $30. Posted by Picasa

10 comments:

pablo said...

Izzat hay or straw?

And where is the palm tree?

pablo said...

Of course it's hay! (duh!) They wouldn't bale it like that if it wasn't. Sorry. Temporary loss of sanity.

Floridacracker said...

Pablo,
You're right, it's hay. Straw is almost unavailable down here.

The palm is on a different farm.

Hick said...

Doesn't look like Florida. Where's Mickey?

Ha! Same could be said about where I live...Doesn't look like California.

Wayne said...

Around here, rustic artists like to use the flat sides of the roll for spraypaint murals. We get scary santas at the end of the year, pumpkinoids at halloween, and all sorts of permutations on American flags.

helosjm - sun blocker for the literate inebriated.

Floridacracker said...

Hick,
Now, you know my mission is to show the Florida nobody knows...even down to underwear trees...sorry about that. Heh!
You are right, your CA doesn't come to mind first when I think of CA, it's too beautiful.

Wayne,
Same thing here, lots of painted hay bales. Also funny looking is a field of them wrapped in protective white plastic. Looks like giant marshmallows.


etqtvfm = manners for volunteer firemen

Wayne said...

klyvrr - what FC is, of course!

roger said...

i have seen hay rolls in plastic, but not painted. how many regular bales would one of those rolls equal?

roxays--words of wisdom from a rock.

threecollie said...

That hay looks real good from up here in the north. It is real scarce this winter....even at 30 bucks a bale.

Floridacracker said...

Wayne,
Following your lead dude.

DPR,
I confess ...I don't know, but it's a great question and I know who to ask! My homework assignment.

3Collie,
First, thanks for commenting and welcome!
I know what you mean. Seems like a good hay year here, yet a few years ago, hay was being shipped in from up north to help out FL farmers who had none due to a drought.